Madrid

Madrid

Carlos Fernández Alvarez, the owner of Abalú Hotel looks forward to welcome you to Madrid

Description

Madrid is strategically located at the geographical centre of the Iberian peninsula, 646 meters above sea level. Its old town is exemplary among major European cities, and blends harmoniously with the most modern and convenient of urban infrastructure. Madrid offers a broad range of accommodation and services along with the most advanced audiovisual and communication technology. All this, combined with the momentum of a society that is dynamic and open, and at the same time warm and welcoming, has turned this metropolis into one of the western world’s great capitals.

Travel guide

How to Get There

Being the capital and located in the centre of Spain, Madrid has perfect infrastructures and is very well accessible.

By plane:
Madrid-Barajas International Airport is located 12 kilometers northeast of the city. It is accessible by public transport (metro and bus), by car (on motorways M-11, M-14, M-21, A-2) and of course by taxi. Madrid Barajas has daily connections to almost all national and international destinations in the world.

By train:
Madrid Atocha railway station:
Madrid Atocha (Spanish: Estación de Madrid Atocha, also named Madrid Puerta de Atocha) is the largest railway station in Madrid. It is the primary station serving commuter trains (Cercanías), intercity and regional trains from the south, and the AVE high speed trains from Barcelona (Catalonia), Saragosse (Aragon), Seville (Andalusia) and Valencia (Levante Region).

Madrid Chamartin railway station:
Madrid Chamartín is the name of the second major railway station in Madrid, Spain. Positioned on the north side of the city, it hosts the railway networks connecting Madrid and north-western Spain, the AVE (high speed line) from Madrid to Segovia and Valladolid, and some Cercanías lines (commuter rail), plus the international line to Lisbon. There are also connections with Atocha. Under the railway station there is a Metro Station (Chamartin) linking with lines 1 and 10 of the Madrid Metro, for travelling to Madrid city centre.

By car:
Madrid is connected with most of the Spanish regions through highways orfreeways. A-1 motorway leads to the north of Spain, A-2 to the northeast, A-3 to the east, A-4 to the south, A-5 to the west and A-6 to the northwest.

Madrid: Plan your journey by public transport

Madrid Chamartín is the name of the second major railway station in Madrid, Spain. Positioned on the north side of the city, it hosts the railway networks connecting Madrid and north-western Spain, the AVE (high speed line) from Madrid to Segovia and Valladolid, and some Cercanías lines (commuter rail), plus the international line to Lisbon. There are also connections with Atocha. Under the railway station there is a Metro Station (Chamartin) linking with lines 1 and 10 of the Madrid Metro, for travelling to Madrid city centre.

Madrid Atocha (Spanish: Estación de Madrid Atocha, also named Madrid Puerta de Atocha) is the largest railway station in Madrid. It is the primary station serving commuter trains (Cercanías), intercity and regional trains from the south, and the AVE high speed trains from Barcelona (Catalonia), Saragosse (Aragon), Seville (Andalusia) and Valencia (Levante Region).

Madrid – Barajas Airport is one of the main points of entry for tourists to Spain. The new extensions have consolidated Barajas as a “hub” airport where airlines can increase connectivity between Latin American, domestic and European markets. Being a true bridge between Europe and Latin America, the airport has consolidated its leading position among world airports.

Madrid weather forecast

Mar 18, 2019 - Mon
Madrid, España
few clouds
48°F few clouds
Wind 10 mph, NE
Humidity 42%
Pressure 768.07 mmHg
mon03/18 tue03/19 wed03/20 thu03/21 fri03/22
sky is clear
48/44°F
sky is clear
55/40°F
sky is clear
52/40°F
sky is clear
55/42°F
sky is clear
53/40°F

Routes

Emblematic buildings of Madrid

Walking tour through Madrid seeing and visiting the most emblematic buildings of Spain’s capital.

During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries Madrid underwent a major transformation in its historic center to suit modern times. At this time, after multiple seizures, and not without rejection of citizenship, the current Gran Vía was built, and the best modernist architects of Spain designed some of their most beautiful buildings in this area.

The route starts on Plaza de Colon, with the monument to Columbus, the Centro Cultural Villa de Madrid (cultural centre of the town of Madrid), the Rumasa Towers and the National Library. Continuing down the Paseo de Recoletos heading toward Plaza de Cibeles, you’ll see some of the old mansions of Madrid’s nobility, such as the current BBVA Palace, the Palace of Linares (reputed to be haunted and current headquarters of the Casa de América), or the Army Headquarters. On Plaza de Cibeles and close to the latter two palaces you’ll admire the Telecommunications Palace (today housing the town hall of Madrid), and the headquarters of the Bank of Spain, recently extended by Spanish architect Rafael Moneo.

Walking up the Alcalá street you’ll find on your right the Cervantes Institute and the former headquarters of the Banco de Viscaya. On the corner of this street with the Gran Vía you’ll see the Metropolis Building, former headquarters of the Union and the Fénix. To the left of the latter are the headquarters of the Ateneo (cultural association) and the Circulo de Bellas Artes (circle of fine arts).

Following up the Alcalá street you’ll see on the right the old Banco Mercantil e Industrial (the commercial and industrial bank) and the Union and the Fénix y Seguros Vitalicio buildings; on the left you’ll find the Alcazar Theater and the old headquarters

of the Banco de Bilbao and the Banco Español de Crédito (Spanish Credit Bank).

At this point, you might continue down the Sevilla Street to see the Congreso de los Diputados (Parliament) and then go to the Plaza de Santa Ana (taking a look at the Teatro Español and the Hotel Victoria) finishing the day with a stroll through the

Barrio de Letras (the neighborhood of letters/writing). Or you could continue toward the Puerta del Sol passing the Casino of Madrid, the Museo de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando (Museum of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Fernando) and the Casa de Aduanas (Customs House).

You could also leave the Puerta del Sol walking along the Preciados Street heading to Callao, with its famous Schweppes logo and the Palacio de la Prensa (Palace of the Press), continuing to the right to see the Telefónica Building and the Oratorio del Caballero de

Gracia chapel, or to the left until you reach the Plaza de España with the Torre de Madrid and the Edificio España – the first skyscrapers of Madrid.

To end the long walk you could head to the Bailen Street and walk by the Senate, the gardens of Sabatini, the Plaza de Oriente, the Royal Theatre and Palace and the Almudena Cathedral.

Distance/Time: Approx. 4 hours
Points:
Gran Vía – Plaza Colón – Paseo de Recoletos – Plaza de Cibeles – Calle Alcalá – Calle Sevilla – Plaza de Santa Ana – Puerta de Sol – Calle Preciados – Callao – Plaza de España – Plaza de España

Hapsburg Madrid

Tourist route through the so-called Hapsburg Madrid, visiting Renaissance and Baroque buildings.

Hapsburg Madrid, or “Madrid de los Austrias”, is the name given to Madrid when the Habsburg dynasty ruled Spain. This reign began with King Charles I, who enriched the city with palaces and monuments. Later, when King Philip II made Madrid the capital of Spain, the city grew significantly.

This route has been conceived to show you the Renaissance and Baroque buildings of that era.

Start the tour on Plaza de Opera (metro station Opera) where you’ll find the Teatro Real (the royal theatre). Take the street on its left that leads to the Palacio Real. After visiting the royal palace and the Almudena Cathedral you’ll get to the junction of Bailen street with Mayor Street, where you’ll find the Consejo de Estado y Capitania General (the Council of State and General Captaincy).

Walking up the street, you’ll get to the Plaza de la Villa, former seat of the town hall, with the Casa de la Villa (house of the town), the Casa Cisneros and the Lujanes Tower. At only a few meters distance you get to the majestic Plaza Mayor (the major square) with the Casa de la Panadería (the bakery house) and the statue of King Philipp III.

You can leave the Plaza heading to the church of San Andrés, in the Latina neighbourhood, and see the chapel of San Isidro. Or taking a little detour leaving the plaza towards Puerta del Sol.

In addition to the statue of the Bear with the Madroño (strawberry tree) and the statue of King Charles III on horseback, you’ll see the famous clock, whose bells mark the traditional eating of the Twelve Grapes and the beginning of a new year, broadcast live on TV since the 60’s. At the entrance to the Casa de Correos (the post office) you’ll find also kilometer-point 0.0, i.e. the site where Spain starts counting the kilometers of all national radial roads.

Leave the Puerta del Sol heading to the Arenal street to visit the Convento de las Descalzas Reales (the convent of the barefoot royals) and the church of San Ginés. And to finish the walk treat yourself with a typical cup of hot chocolate with Churros or Porras (fried-dough pastry) in the San Ginés chocolate shop.

Distance/Time: Visiting the royal palace it takes approx. 4-5 hours
Points:
Plaza de Opera – Palacio Real – Teatro Real – Catedral de la Almudena – Plaza Mayor – Plaza de la Villa – Puerta del Sol

Stroll through the Buen Retiro Park

Nice stroll through Madrid’s most important green area, the Buen Retiro Park.

Located in the heart of Madrid, the park’s origins date from the reign of Philip IV, when the Buen Retiro Palace was built by the Count-Duke of Olivares.

This walk is perfect in spring, but you can do it any weekend of the year with fine weather.

It begins on Plaza de Cibeles square. Walk up the Alcalá street to the gate of Alcalá (Puerta de Alcalá) on whose right you’ll find the entrance to the Buen Retiro Park. Walk until getting to the lake. That’s where most of performances and street shows take place. There is also the possibility to rent a rowing boat.

Upon arrival at the lake, turn right to get to the other side. Go down a steep street to get to the Crystal Palace, a beautiful building in the middle of the park that is often used for temporary exhibitions of various kinds. Walking further down you’ll get to the statue of the Fallen Angel, the only monument in the world dedicated to Lucifer. From this place, head toward the Rosaleda, a very nice area especially in late spring.

Walking further down the street, you’ll get to the exit of the park and on Cuesta de los Moyanos slope where each weekend of the year takes place a second-hand book fair. At the end of the slope and on your left you’ll see the Ministry of Agriculture and the Atocha station where you can take the metro o a train.

Distance/Time: 2-3 hours
Points:
Plaza de Cibeles – Calle Alcalá – Buen Retiro Park – Atocha Station

Festivals and Events

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